Comoros - you've heard of it, right?

We glaze towards the stars while there's yet so much to discover on earth
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Okay, granted: You have no chance of being the first person to reach Comoros. People have been living here for at least 1,400 years and the first European explorers found Comoros 500 years ago. But something you should know about Eastern Africa is that the European explorers were not the first outsiders to arrive! Nope, because Eastern Africa is close to the Middle East and Arabic seafarers got here first. So you are way to late as an explorer...although: Who do you know who has been here? Oh, you don't know where it is? Well it's a tiny archipelago formed by 3 volcanic island and they are jammed in between Madagascar and the mainland of East Africa. That puts them in the Indian Ocean.
 
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The population is kind and peaceful. The country has seen its share of violence, but that's over a decade ago and revolved around who gets to be the biggest fish in a very small pond. About 20 coups/coup attempts have swept across the Comoros island.
 
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It's one of Africa's 54 countries and a member of the African Union. However it's also a member of the Arab League. Actually the most southernmost country of them all. French is commonly spoken by most Comorians, however amongst them selves they commonly speak Comorian or Arabic. So I got to brush up on all the French which Western and Central African countries had beaten into me (the beating most took place in Central African countries).
 
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As a huge contrast to Tanzanian Zanzibar no one has even come close to harassing me with "very cheap prices" and other common tricks. Nope, Comorians simply greet me with a Salaam Alaikum (peace be upon you) or a Bonjour Monsieur. Everyone is super friendly and forthcoming if I approach them. No one has been over eager to sell me anything. Islam runs deep in Comoran history and Sunni Muslims account for around 98% of the population. 
 
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It's a severely poor country which would baffle anyone with a minor sense for business. Simply because it's made for tourism!! Beautiful beaches, friendly population, nature to hike in, an active volcano to stick your head into, fresh fish to be eaten, culture to be explored. On that note I believe this is the first country I have come across with multiple women wearing some sort of facial paint? It immediately caught my eye as I disembarked the "Aziza" which had brought me to Comoros from Dar es Salaam. 5 days at sea with a few passengers, a few goats, a few cows and a lot of cargo. This volcanic island was a sight for sore eyes when it appeared in the distance.
 
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Immigration came onboard and chaos took place for a while as if this was the first time they had ever received a boatful of passengers. And I'm fairly sure it wasn't the first time! However as the dust settled and we were permitted to disembark the ship immigration was straightforward as the highest port authority, a mister Almiraty, guided us through the process. A visa on arrival costs the same as a visa at the embassy: €30. I paid for it then and there, received 5 stamps in my passport and was released into Moroni, the capital city (town) of the Comoros islands.
 
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That is when I began to notice these painted faces among several women in the streets. It's known to foreigners as the "Comoran mask" and consists of a paste of ground sandalwood and coral. Apparently as protection from the sun. Amongst Comorians it's known as "msinzano". Traditional Comorian women also wear colorful sari-like dresses.
 
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I've found my way into a part of the already small expat community. Comoros is only about 800,000 inhabitants and with a handicapped economy there isn't much of an expat community to begin with. However the ones I have met are great! One night I was invited to dinner in a flashy house with an extraordinary view and a spectacular garden. It costs less to live in that palace than to live in my apartment back home?!? So good for them. I was served rum with banana and later on wine and dinner. Amongst us were Alexis and Julia from France, Raf and Annalis from Belgium, Elodie and Leo also from France, Audrey from France and Martin who was only visiting for a few days...but also from France. However they all stayed kind to me and kept conversations in English. Mercy on their souls! ;)
 
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Since Raf works as a mechanical engineer at the main port I hooked up with him again a few days later. He showed me around and pointed me in the right direction regarding finding a boat ride towards Madagascar. Initially when I arrived onboard "Aziza" I saw two small cargo ships, "Mojangaya" and "Riziky", which were both offering to take passengers to Madagascar. So I automatically thought that finding a ship would be easy. However Raf told me that those 2 only come around once every month! They just happened to be there on the day I arrived.
 
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There's another option; a ferry departs every Wednesday but charges €150!! That's a pretty steep price on a $20/day budget. So let's see what gives...I might work something out one of the upcoming days. I'm keen on mowing onward soon. However I'm also really hooked on trekking to the top of the nearby active volcano known as Karthala. It can be done within a day (up and down) if you start early in the morning.
 
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We're within the month of the Ramadan which is a holy event for Muslims all around the world. It's a month of fasting between sunrise and sunset. During the remaining hours they can eat and drink as they please. It's supposed to be good for a number of things and not only being strictly religious. I imagine there must be a lot of social bonding for people who are all going through the same thing while looking forward to dinner. Apart from that I also see that it strengthens discipline in some ways. Anyway...its naturally a big thing in a country with 98% Muslims.
 
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And it's a bit of a shame for me. Because I walk around Moroni seeing all these potentially nice looking restaurants and coffeeshops which are all closed during the day due to the Ramadan. Besides many places close early so I need to get stuff done as early as possible. Internet is a bit of a headache as there are constant power cuts and a general lack of wifi. It's available though of you know where to look for it. So is food during day hours although I consider it immensely impolite to eat and drink in front of anyone who is fasting. 
 
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You would most definitely get away with eating in front of a fasting person though. The population is too polite and too passive to object. In general were not at all talking about religious fanatics. Quite the opposite with alcohol available in public places and a general easy moderate attitude to religious doctrines.
 
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So what do I think about one of the worlds poorest countries? I think the population is asleep...as are most people in the world ;) Nothing comes from nothing. Go to sleep early and wake up late will not work for most people. As well as working hard all day may not make you a millionaire. Work smart. Dream big. Get started. Hold hands. Listen, learn and be patient...but not too patient. Smile, be kind and don't be afraid of what you don't know. Comoros should be rich! Perhaps someday you will be sipping your Bacardi here ;)
 
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Best regards
Mr. Torbjørn C. Pedersen (Thor) - not a millionaire.
"A stranger is a friend you've never met before"
 
Once Upon A Saga
 
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The lost adventure: Reaching Comoros.

Around me the ocean stretches beyond my imagination
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I write you with my back up against a wall. I feel the vibration of the ships engine. This ship was built in Greece long ago. Perhaps more then 50 years ago. I wonder who and what it might have carried in the past? Today the name "Aziza" is painted on her side with black paint. The weather is calm, but we are moving against both the current and the wind. I feel how we are moving from side to side. From side to side. From side to side. The rumble of the engine sends vibrations up against my back. Somewhere below me there is the deep, dark, salty ocean. I haven't seen land for 4 straight days. In fact I haven't seen anything, but the ocean and the sky for 4 straight days. No other ships, no dolphins, no whales... The dark blue ocean meets the light blue sky at the horizon. I can hear some of the other passengers speaking in the background. Perhaps in Swahili, perhaps in Arabic, perhaps something else? I'm not really listening. How did I end up on the "Aziza"?
 
My sister and I were joining the GIVE volunteers (www.givevolunteers.org) on "dolphin day" back on Zanzibar. "Swimming with dolphins" didn't quite turn out the way I pictured it. It was more like: "Hunting for dolphins" and landing on them if possible. I was picturing a nice calm bay with clear water and myself floating within it, while curious dolphins would come and play with me. However what I experienced was 6-7 speedboats racing across the ocean in the search for Flipper. When we eventually did come across Flipper and his friends about 30 of us would dive into the ocean hoping for a glimpse of them. But too often the Dolphins would disappear. Meanwhile the boats would dance around in the waves while the air filled with petrol fumes.
 
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I've done some research and it doesn't have to be like that. In fact it wasn't like that for David and Marguerite who I met on the train weeks before. They went to the same location, but on that day they were nearly alone and had a much different experience. Would I do it again? No! Not like that...but perhaps I would somewhere else under different circumstances...
 
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That day continued quite well as we later on arrived at Jozani Chwaka Bay National Park, where we were introduced to some of the plants and trees, but moreover went just to see the Colobus monkeys. It was astonishing to see them as we might as well have been invisible to them?!? They went on with their monkey business and completely ignored us. I could have touched one if I wanted to. But there was no sign of interaction with us from their part. I've never seen that before? Either monkeys are scared and try to escape or they are curious and try to touch. This was quite interesting and everyone seemed to respect the tranquility of the situation.
 
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That day ended with a look around inside the old part of Stonetown, Zanzibar's main town, which is fairly charming although as a tourist, you are subject to constant harassment from shop owners: "Come have a look! Looking costs nothing!!" And the classic: "For you special price..." I must admit I haven't come across the "Your father is a THIEF!! He must be!!! Because he stole the 2 most beautiful stars in the sky and put them in your eyes..." Perhaps that one isn't in fashion anymore? Or perhaps my beard puts the salesmen off?
 
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Old fort in Stonetown.
 
I had some help from a friend I have in Germany regarding getting onboard the containership from Zanzibar to Comoros. The Sagas financial sponsor, Ross Offshore, also tried contacting the shipowners. But all our efforts were in vain. I think we took that lead as far as we could. I mean; we spoke with the company using the ship, the company who owns the ship and then after being turned down twice we called them again and asked in German. I guess we could take it one step further but then again...don't push it, hey? ;)
 
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Tourists aren't an endangered species - they are fair game ;)
 
So I ended up calling Gayo who was my original lead on a ship from Dar es Salaam to Comoros. But it turned out that Gayo "no speaki English very well". So I had someone local call Gayo and speak Swahili. Originally the price for having me onboard was 250,000 schilling, but that went up to 300,000 ($136) when Gayo found out that I was Mzungu. That's a 50,000 schilling ($23) tax on skin color. Thank you very much. 
 
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One day my sister and I drove down to Paje on the lower eastern side of Zanzibar. We went to meet a Danish adventurer named Mikkel. But Mikkel was out on the ocean with some local fishermen, when we arrived so we ended up meeting David, his wife and 2 daughters instead. David is another Danish Dane from Denmark who runs the Savannah & Ocean beach hotel at Paje. Right next door you'll find a Danish school which also keeps David busy (http://www.zanzibar-hojskolen.dk/). Unfortunately all the students were out so we didn't get to meet them.
 
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Yes you guessed it: The handles do not move on this clock.
 
David is a really great guy and not only because he offered us lunch at his restaurant ;) We had a good conversation running him when Mikkel finally showed up. Mikkel is my age. He has shaved his head and he has let his beard grow. He once rode his bicycle from Denmark (Northern Europe) to Antarctica. That adventure took him about 11 months. These days he is keeping busy collecting recipes from all over the world. He calls himself "Mad Mikkel" (www.madmikkel.dk) which is a great name. Mainly because "mad" is the Danish word for food ;)
 
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That's David on the left and Mad Mikkel on the right.
 
I liked him straight away and it didn't take long before Mikkel, my sister and I were having beer on the beach and talking about the world. 
 
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Just to remind you all...I'm still onboard "Aziza". The air is thick of the stench from carrying us (about 20 passengers) across the open sea. "Aziza" used to carry passengers and vehicles somewhere long ago. Perhaps between the Greek islands? Her British engine has been replaced at least once. It's giving us all its got against the strong current. But in spite of the engines efforts we are only going half the speed compared to going westbound. We hardly reach 4 nots. So I can run faster than this (although running on water isn't my speciality). It's dark outside and the cattle and sheep are keeping quiet. Yes! Cattle and sheep as we are not the only passengers onboard. Apart from the livestock I have also observed a few vehicles and perhaps a thousand madrases plus additional cargo. I bought myself 10 bananas and 6 liters of water before boarding thinking that it was a 2-3 day voyage. Think again...4 days going on 5 and counting. I need a shower...
 
Back on Zanzibar Mikkel had to leave us as he was having a local dinner with a local family. My sister and I also had to leave as we were having dinner with German David and South African Marguerite which you should know by now? Well, they have somehow found their way into the past 3 blogs? I met them in connection with the train ride to Dar es Salaam. Afterwards we stayed at the same hotel. We also had dinner together on my sisters first night in Tanzania and now we were having dinner with them on Zanzibar. David and Marguerite are soon to be married and plan to move to Hannover in Germany. They are both teachers and I hope to crash on their couch in case I redo most of Europe after Africa (which I'm still thinking about doing).
 
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From om left to right: Marguerite, David, my sister (Tove) and the king of the jungle.
 
Anyway, David and Marguerite were planing on taking the "spice tour" the following day and we were welcome to join. So we did. And that was an excellent choice. Marguerite had been on the tour once before. But it was a first for David, my sister and I. Suffice to say there is a lot that grows on Zanzibar!! But what I found to be most interesting about the tour was learning that cinnamon is actually the bark from a tree and furthermore that it takes 9 months to grow vanilla!
 
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To the left: Cinnamon. To the right: Vanilla.
 
The day eventually came when we had to say farewell to the GIVE volunteers and their guides. I find traveling fast to be much easier on the heart. We had unfortunately stayed too long with those people for my heart to go unattached. The question remains as always: Were they simply a random group of great people - or are people generally great? ;)
 
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There are a lot of great people in this photo. Especially the guy in the white t-shirt in the far back :)
 
My sister and I caught the ferry back to Dar and guess who else was onboard? Yes, but of course, who else could it be than David and Marguerite! And since they had no other immediate plans the 4 of us decided on returning to the same hotel we all knew from 2 weeks earlier. That was however a rough ferry ride back to Dar for the ladies...and for about a third of the passengers who had to throw up. Later at night the 4 of us met with Mikkel who had also returned to Dar. We all sat together on a rooftop and smoked shisha (water pipe) and had tea.
 
Helene is a Swedish woman whom I have never met. But she has been very helpful and has even offered accommodation in Dar. I'm sure that I will meet her once I return to Dar. But so far she has already helped me out with the boat to Comoros. She has a friend who has been calling Gayo trying to work out the final price for getting onboard "Aziza" and the remaining details: where, when, what...
 
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The hotel where I was staying at with my sister (and David and Marguerite) has also been very helpful. Because getting on that boat didn't at any point seem straight forward. Originally I should have been onboard Monday the 13th. But that moved to Tuesday which was fine as that was also the day my sisters flight left. So I hugged my sister and thanked her for visiting...then I shoved her into a taxi and saw her leave towards the airport. I then bought myself some food, checked out of the hotel and left for the port on the back of a motorcycle. Business as usual.
 
At the port I was told that "Aziza" wouldn't leave until Wednesday night? Quite odd as Gayo had told me to be at the port around 7pm although it would probably leave at midnight. Now I called Gayo from the port and was told that it was delayed. Thank you Gayo... So back through traffic and back to Hotel Livingstone. It's a nice hotel with decent wifi and breakfast included. The staff is friendly and they gave me a good rate. The following day was spent doing administrative tasks and following up on events with Gayo on the phone. In the afternoon he guaranteed departure Wednesday night and told me to go to the port. So I did. At the port I was told by security to wait outside. I sat down with a group of people who turned out to be passengers. There was even another Mzungu among them: Gerben from the Netherlands. Gerben had been to the embassy of Comoros and already had his visa. He had also handed over his passport to the ships agent and he had paid 300,000 schilling for his ticket. I had nothing. My research told me I could get my visa on arrival and Gayo hadn't sold me any ticket yet...besides my price had fluctuated between 250-300,000 schilling on the phone. A bystander was able to tell me that he had paid 240,000 schilling. 
 
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Gate number 1 at Dar es Salaam port.
 
Someone, not Gayo, came out of the port and started going through the ships manifest checking off names. He discovered that my name wasn't on the ships manifest. To me it seemed like a last minute thing, but I forked over my passport and my name was added. There was no discussion: 300,000 schilling. THAT'S a lot of money!! 
 
We all got onboard and I suppose the ship left around midnight. But I was fast asleep long before then. 2-3 days is what they told me...I never saw Gayo...
 
This is now my 5th night onboard. So my overall spendings are quickly coming down. It's now 60,000 schilling/day which kind of includes food. 1-2 portions per day which often consists of some overly overcooked rice along with mystery meat. 60,000 schilling/day is $27/day which isn't too bad...
 
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Gerben living life large on top of "Aziza".
 
Earlier today I was looking at the sunset being swallowed by some cumulus clouds which were rapidly turning pink behind us. The engine of "Aziza" was slowly but steadily pushing us forward towards Comoros as it had been for the past few days. I was gently whistling the theme melody to Indiana Jones...and somewhere, days behind us, lies Dar es Salaam with its exotic name.
 
Who gets on a 50 year old Greek ship in the Indian Ocean? And who catches a boat from Dar es Salaam to Comoros? And what do any of us know about that tiny island nation apart from how it's spelt? I'm sure there is a great adventure to be found here. However for me it simply feels like another day within the Saga. I wonder if there isn't an important lesson hidden in that? Is it "too much of anything..." or is it "live everyday as if..." or is it...?
 
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Can you spot the sheep?
 
Oh well, let's just keep on keeping on ;)
 

Best regards
Mr. Torbjørn C. Pedersen (Thor) - still going...
"A stranger is a friend you've never met before"
 
Once Upon A Saga
 
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Is Zanzibar Tanzania? And Dolphins :)

Island hopping - the first battle
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Last week I left you all with the trains arrival at the historically exotic Dar es Salaam. It feels good just to say the name out loud: Dar es Salaam...
 
I aimed straight for the hotel my sister and I had agreed on. Marguerite, David and Sean (from the previous blog) joined me at the hotel since they had no other arrangements. The "family" was still together :)
 
I spoke to the receptionist who game me a room number. I knocked on the door and there she was! My 5 year younger sister was standing in the door in flesh and blood!! Apart from a million online messages and a bunch of Skype calls, this was the first time we saw each other after nearly 2 years and 7 months!!! She had arrived in Tanzania just to see me (and to spend her vacation in an exotic place).
 
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Siblings.
 
We all agreed to go out together that night at a famed Ethiopian restaurant. So technically I got a little ahead of myself in terms of countries and culture. But I've had plenty of Turkish food while on the road so it's not a first offense. My sister (Tove), Marguerite, David, Sean and I sat around a small low table at the restaurant and enjoyed the atmosphere. The food was served and we all agreed to share. And as per custom we ate with our fingers to soak up the full Ethiopian experience. Imagine that? A German, a South African, an American and 2 Danes had to travel all the way to Dar es Salaam to meet each other in Tanzania ;)
 
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Dar es Salaam.
 
The next day Tove and I went out to find the port. For whatever reason security let us right in, so we ventured around for a while. After speaking to a lot of people we finally got in touch with Mr Gayo, who appears to be the main contact for a vessel which goes to Comoros. If all goes well then Comoros will soon become country number 113.
 
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Dar es Salaam port - a very big place! 
 
 
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I didn't initially think much about Dar es Salaam. But as the days progressed I got to see more and the cities charm started to get to me. After just 3 days in Dar I was in love. What a city! The National museum was good value for me. There is an art gallery, a section about colonialism, the struggle for independence, cave paintings throughout all of Africa, the presidents old cars and more...there was plenty to read and I think I could have spent a full day there.
 
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In terms of food you can find it all in Dar. As mentioned, on our first night we had Ethiopian, but we also manger to try the local Tanzanian cuisine along with Lebanese and Indian food. The botanical garden is a very small place, but a nice breath of fresh air. Furthermore Dar borders the Indian Ocean which provides for a nice backdrop in several places. We also managed to locate Kariakoo market, which is a must see for anyone who has never set foot at a local market place.
 
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The GIVE team of June 2016. 
 
Thomas is an American who works for www.GIVEvolunteers.org which is an NGO that combines humanitarian work with adventure travel. Thomas had been following the Saga long, before he contacted me to ask if I could come and visit him and the volunteers at GIVE. Sean by the way, had left to Moshi so he could summit Kilimanjaro. And Marguerite and David had also left Dar in order to go and explore Zanzibar. So when Thomas was ready to receive us, we met up with him at the Zanzibar ferry. He's a great and energetic guy who I liked from the moment I met him. Along with about 30 young volunteers we boarded the ferry and left Dar. 90 minutes later we approached the island where we had to show our vaccination card and have our passports stamped, before we could officially enter the island.
 
A truck picked us up and drove us all 1 hour northeast to a guesthouse called Baby Bush Lodge located at the light blue Indian Ocean between palm trees and soft white sand. That would become our base. Not bad at all.
 
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The GIVE project in Cairo (Zanzibar) has been going for 4 years now.
 
We were introduced to the GIVE team. John is Thomas' good friend and colleague who is fond of shouting WHOOOOOOOO! And YEEEAAAAH!! Kelsey and Jules are both upbeat, charming and energetic. Dominica has a contagious laugh and the 5 of them form a super strong team which is impossible to dislike. The roughly 30 volunteers are mostly Americans in their early twenties along with a few Brits. Spirits are high and everyone is fun to be around. For some of the Americans this is their first time overseas. For some it's the first time in an airplane. And for at least one of them it's the first time to see the ocean.
 
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The school will open in July 2016 and it's already massively impressive. This is only a small part of it.
 
The volunteers spend 14 days in Tanzania before returning home. About 8 days are spent on constructing a school and educating local students. The rest of their 14 days are in connection with adventurous experiences: Swimming with dolphins, interacting with monkeys, shopping locally, going on a Safari and for some even summiting Kilimanjaro!
 
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Most of these volunteers are students and the vast majority are women. It kind of makes me want to go back in time and be an American student. The guys are super cool and the energy is really high. I'm such a dinosaur... I recently read a post on Facebook that said: "I've reached an age where I no longer need to be drunk to fall asleep on the couch". Yup, that's me. Another FB post simply read: "I hope that on the day I die, I die early in the morning, so I don't waste a day working". 
 
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The picture is from downtown Dar es Salaam.
 
Zanzibar. That sounds pretty exotic too! And it is. It's "the spice island" in the same way Caribbean Grenada is. It has got beautiful beaches and the color of the ocean resembles what I've only seen in the Bahamas. Driving around on the island could resemble many tropical places in the world. The slave market history of Zanzibar is not complete unlike the history of Cape Verde or São Tomé & Príncipe...but the twist is that in Eastern Africa it began with the Arabs and not the Europeans. However the Europeans soon followed: Portuguese, German, British...and let's all keep in mind that slavery began in Africa long before any outsiders arrived.
 
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I remember hearing about Zanzibar for the first time long ago. It was at a workplace where a colleague had recently been to Zanzibar with his wife. He was completely taken with the island and blurted out: "IT'S THE ISLAND WHERE EVERYTHING COMES FROM!!"
 
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We had the chance to meet with John who is a member of the Danish travelers club. He's going around the world on his 11th month now.
 
That has always had me curious and I intend to explore more of that aspect of the island. But that is also good news for something completely different. Namely that an island with a high level of production must also have export. And to me that means BOATS! I had already found a mention online that there might be good odds for finding a boat from Zanzibar to Comoros. So one day I joined Thomas for a meeting in Stonetown, which is the main town on the island. Afterwards we ran a few errands and then stopped by the port. A large containership was being loaded in the background when we met Ibrahim. Ibrahim thought we wanted to climb Kilimanjaro. So did everyone else. But slowly he understood that we required a boat to Comoros. "Sorry, not possible! Only from Dar es Salaam", he said. We thanked Ibrahim, exchanged telephone numbers and left. 15 minutes later Ibrahim called to say he remembered something. Thomas and I returned to the port and Ibrahim led us to a shipping agent. This agent advised us of UAFL (United African Feeder Line) which operates a ship that frequents Comoros twice a month. Soon thereafter we met with Captain Shaffi who is the agent for UAFL in Stonetown. He's a really pleasant man who has sailed the seven seas for 35 years. The captain gave me the contact details for the responsible person within UAFL in Mauritius where the head office is. I emailed him and the following day I received a reply stating that they don't take passengers.
 
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Very well. Is that a dead end then? Hahahahaha!! Don't make me laugh like that ;) For those of you who have been tagging along for a while, you know this is not a dead end. We always keep on keeping on. And some of you might even remember a similar situation in 2014 when I needed to go from Iceland to Canada. The charterers of the vessel said no, but the owners said yes. So now we need to approach the owners and let them know that I'm not a simple backpacker and let them know about the Saga.
 
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I have 2 sisters. It's hard to work out which one is the most crazy one?
 
Ross Offshore has been the financial sponsor of the Saga right from the beginning. But they are more than that. They made the arrangements for me to get onboard the ship from Iceland to Canada 2 years ago. So they will also give it a try with the owners for this ship, which is owned by German DAL (Deutsche Afrika-Linien). So right now it's a waiting game. Meanwhile let's not forget Mr Gayo in Dar. He could also be the key to reach Comoros. Alternatively I'll pull a Jack Sparrow and strap two turtles to my feet...
 
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The picture is from downtown Dar es Salaam.
 
Tove (my sister) and I will be joining the GIVE volunteers today on a day trip. Among other things we will try to swim with dolphins if they are willing to come close. And who knows...maybe a dolphin knows something.
 
In short: Yes! Zanzibar is Tanzania. But it wasn't always so and its worth taking a quick look at the interesting history of it. Or you could just drop by at the national museum in Dar ;)
 
The current average for time spent in each country is at 9 days. If we are unable to bring that down to 7 then we are looking at a 5 year journey.
 
Until next week...
 
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Best regards
Mr. Torbjørn C. Pedersen (Thor) - dolphin whisperer
"A stranger is a friend you've never met before"
 
Once Upon A Saga
 
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